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=The Warwick Thumb Club=

Discussion in 'Bass Guitars' started by thndrstk6, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. Luc67

    Luc67

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    producing light is more energy-consuming than producing sound !!! :D
     
  2. PaulS

    PaulS Good Vibe Sponsor

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    That’s because light moves faster :p
     
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  3. UK Ken

    UK Ken

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    I thought I would get out my 87 Thumb NT4 and give it a play and clean. upload_2020-4-3_12-52-46.jpeg
     
  4. LenMinNJ

    LenMinNJ

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    Thought you all might like to see my Thumb NT4 that I converted to a medium scale. (My hands don't like
    doing the four-fret stretch down near the nut on long scale basses.)

    We moved the nut up to where the first fret was, and moved the dot markers on the side of the neck.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2020
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  5. Hardy

    Hardy Supporting Member Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Pics don’t work?
     
  6. BrusselsBass

    BrusselsBass Supporting Member

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    Interesting!
     
  7. LenMinNJ

    LenMinNJ

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    I'll try again.

    20200403_091415.jpg 32-inch-scale-conversion1.jpg 32-inch-scale-conversion2.jpg
     
  8. Luc67

    Luc67

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    Really very strange this shift !
    How are you tuned ?
     
  9. Hardy

    Hardy Supporting Member Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Never saw such a thing before.
     
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  10. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Wow. That's different. You could have just put a capo at the first fret and accomplished the same thing I think. It's still a 34" scale bass, but now you don't have the E A D G open string notes. Instead, you will have to tune the open strings to F Bb Eb Ab to maintain the correct pitch at all the other frets. You can't change the scale length on a fretted instrument without moving all the frets due to the fact that the scale length change also changes the distances between the points along each string where the correct pitch is located. You can verify this with an accurate electronic tuner. Maybe converting it to fretless would be the way to go. You could then just mark the correct pitch locations down the side of the neck.
     
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  11. LenMinNJ

    LenMinNJ

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    It's tuned normally: e a d g.
     
  12. LenMinNJ

    LenMinNJ

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    It's tuned EADG, and its scale length is 32 inches. It's exactly as if we capoed at first fret and tuned down a half step. You don't have to move your frets when you use a capo, do you?

    The intonation is still perfect.

    We also moved the dot markers on the side of the fretboard. You can see the dot at the new third fret in this picture. 20200405_093203.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
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  13. tgsm7

    tgsm7

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    Hi all, here is my '06 thumb BO 4. I got it late last year, along with a NT5, but I got on with the 4 a lot better. After being a Fender player for years, I really like the feel and look of Warwicks, especially the thumb. I just had a solid brass nut made for it. IMG_20200405_164609270.jpg IMG_20200405_164633006.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
  14. Luc67

    Luc67

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    Hi tgsm7, welcome on board!
    Your nut look like very solid yes but you loose the adjustment possibility.
     
  15. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Well, if it makes you happy........that's all that really matters.

    However, I would like to point out that a capo does not, and is not used for, changing the scale length. It is commonly used on "egg slicers" to facilitate the easier playing of certain songs. If you place a capo at the 5th fret on said 6 string your open strings would change from EADGBE to ADGCEA. The intonation doesn't change in this scenario because you don't change the tuning, you are just fretting all the strings at the 5th fret. It appears you have effectively shortened the scale length by approximately 2 inches. I am pretty certain that the distances between the frets on a 32" and 34" scale instruments is not exactly the same. It would be very close, but not exact. Please understand that I am not trying to discourage or upset you. I am just presenting some, hopefully useful, factual information. There may be a member here with much more knowledge in this area than me, and if so, I invite them to share their insight on this topic. If I am incorrect in my analysis here, I would definitely like to know where I am going wrong.

    I would like to add that I use a capo on my basses on a regular basis as a setup tool. I put it at the first fret and then I can easily hold down a string at the fret closest to the pickups and check the neck relief by measuring the gap between the string and the 12th fret.
     
  16. tgsm7

    tgsm7

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    Thanks for the welcome Luc

    I'd rather have the full contact of the nut,t 2 small points of the JUN 3, also I trust my tech with the set up.
     
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  17. LenMinNJ

    LenMinNJ

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    If you compared the fret spacing of a 34-inch bass from the first fret to the bridge, and the fret spacing of a bass that has a 32-inch scale length from the nut to the bridge, you'd learn something very interesting. They're identical.

    True fact!
     
  18. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Here is a link to a very useful fret position calculator provided by the StewMac luthier tool and supplies company. It clearly shows the fret spacing differences between a 34" and 32" scale:

    Fret Position Calculator | stewmac.com
     
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  19. LenMinNJ

    LenMinNJ

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    Perhaps you're not understanding what you're seeing. Plug in a scale length of 34-inches and look at the fret spacing from the first fret up. Then plug in a scale length of 32.08 inches and look at the fret spacing from the nut up. You'll see that they're identical to within a thousandth of inch.
     
  20. BrusselsBass

    BrusselsBass Supporting Member

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    Well, I believe the solution you found is creative. It is not about mm or 1/1000 inch. If you are happy with the bass playability, this is what counts!! Enjoying playing!!!
     
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