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Help With Damaged Truss Rod Adjustment Screw

Discussion in 'Bass Guitars' started by kimgee, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Hey guys, I recently got a Warwick with a damaged truss rod adjustment screw. The previous owner said the truss rod was kinda stiff to turn, but said nothing of the damaged screw. The hex head is wallowed out to the point where the Warwick tool won't even turn it. I have been able to turn the screw a little bit by using a larger hex wrench, but I could definitely see this becoming a fatal problem. Does anyone know of a way to deal with a worn hex head on the truss rod like this? It is really sad that this issue is on a gorgeous PNut II. It is an awesome guitar, and I really like it, but this is a serious issue. Very sad indeed. Thanks in advance for any insight anyone can offer.
     
  2. jester

    jester ocdemon Moderator

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    I'm afraid the right way to fix this is replacing the truss rod, which would involve removing and reglueing the fretboard.
     
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  3. Hardy

    Hardy Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Oh shayte. I once had such a bass too. I gave it back to the seller.
     
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  4. DiMarco

    DiMarco nutcase Good Vibe Sponsor

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  5. Florin

    Florin Warwick Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    If only the head is worn you don't need to worry, there are more ways to make it useable. One of them is to carve 2 indentations, so you can use a large flat head screwdriver.
     
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  6. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Thanks to everyone for the advice. I am especially grateful to DiMarco for posting the video, I have already ordered one of those grippy tools. and I think that will really do the trick. Sorry for taking so long to get back to you guys, but I have the worst cold I have had in years. I have been sick for a week now, and still feel lousy.
     
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  7. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    This is the guitar with the issue. I am pretty confident that I can resolve the situation. I certainly hope so anyway, because it is one sweet guitar.


    DSCN4510.JPG DSCN4511.JPG
     
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  8. Nachobassman

    Nachobassman Bass, Tapas, and Rn´R!

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    Nice gee-ta... No!... Nice BASS!

    Hope you could solve it soon. :)
     
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  9. jester

    jester ocdemon Moderator

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    Get well soon and enjoy the bass!
     
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  10. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    I received the spiffy tool from StewMac, and it does work, just not as good as I had hoped. For one thing, in the close up in the video, the hex end appears to have rows of ridges in it to add grip. I bought 2 tools, one straight and one 90 degree, and neither one has those ridges. The hex bolt on this bass doesn't look as bad as the one in the video, and yet, the grip is not real solid and confidence inspiring. It works, but I fear, over time, the issue will become worse and will require more drastic measures. I do think that this tool is a wise choice for regular adjustments on undamaged hex bolts, so they stay undamaged. I have noticed that the Warwick tool is a pretty sloppy fit, and is probably part of the reason behind this issue. I plan to use these StewMac tools for truss rod adjustments on my Warwicks from now on.
     
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  11. DiMarco

    DiMarco nutcase Good Vibe Sponsor

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    So it is "some sort of okay" now? :D
     
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  12. Narcdor

    Narcdor

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    Those gripper drivers are pretty good on a damaged nut, but I would only be using it to get the nut out not on all your basses, as it is tapered it puts more pressure on the opening lip of the nut and for longevity you want maximum contact plus proper lubrication. I had to get a gripper from stewmac on a bullet truss rod G&L I was fixing up that stripped pretty bad and needed replacing. Over time if the nut is already damaged I expect it will degrade further with use but once you’re setup Warwick necks don’t move much in my experience so you could be fine for quite a while. Anyway if it gets you another few years before having to do major surgery it’s well worth it. Nice bass too! The second version is my fav!
     
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  13. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Overall, the bass is pretty awesome. The truss rod adjusts reasonably well, but the grip between the hex nut and the tool is not as firm as one would like. The fact that you have to position the tool "just right" and it still tends to feel a tad "mushy" sometimes, isn't real confidence inspiring. However, I am confident I can get it set-up the way I want without any problems. My main concern at this point is the effect this issue has on the resale value, but it feels like a keeper, so I am not really sweating that. The seller ended up being a really good person to deal with and we worked out the situation to both of our satisfaction. The bass had the original drop tuner replaced with a regular tuner, and an OBP-3 pre-amp installed, and the seller included the originals with the bass. It came in a new Spector hard case with the COA and the Warwick truss rod tool, which somewhat amusingly, is useless on this bass. I ended up paying a total, with shipping, of $1825USD. So, I still think it was a good deal, which is the only reason I made the financial stretch to get it. I have long lusted for a PNut II, which is the best of the 3 versions in my opinion, and I have never seen one priced below $3K in the US, so I went for it.
     
  14. kimgee

    kimgee Wenge Taste Tester Good Vibe Sponsor

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    That's good advice, and I plan on experimenting with how the tool fits in the various Warwicks that I have. I must say though, most of my Warwick basses seem to have a higher amount of wear and tear apparent on the truss rod hex nuts, compared to the other brands of basses I own. I have encountered, what I would consider, and unreasonable amount of truss rod issues with the Warwicks. I am not sure why that is the case, but I have heard other Warwick owners express the same sentiment. Maybe it's just luck of the draw, or maybe there are some design issues involved, but whatever it is, it's not enough of a deterrent to cure me of my severe Warwick addiction. :)
     
  15. DiMarco

    DiMarco nutcase Good Vibe Sponsor

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    The early nineties dual action aluminium rods lack strength. I had mine customized using more sturdy alloys in the dolphin 5str. Late eighties iron rods are good but heavy.

    The later non-removable rods seem to be good. Owners butchering the adjustment screw whether or not to combat neck problems is something Warwick can't help.

    I haven't had any problem with 2000-current Warwick necks. Mid nineties Warwicks are something I stsy away from though. Horrible hardware and bad necks being the main reason.
     
  16. Narcdor

    Narcdor

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    I think the harder woods used in the necks has resulted in more stripping with people who don’t know how to avoid it. Also I think Warwick owners are just more adventurous than the average P and J crowd and will likely give it a go. Just something to be aware of and check with used basses before buying, truss rod and neck warp are my two, the rest is pretty easy to fix.
     
  17. jester

    jester ocdemon Moderator

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    My guess is usually thicker necks that require more truss rod force, combined with the fact that people turn the rods without first taking some of the neck pressure off (essentially by pulling the headstock back while turning).
     
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