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Why do Warwicks lose value so quick?

Discussion in 'Bass Guitars' started by Hoggles, Jul 29, 2008.

  1. Hoggles

    Hoggles Good Vibe Sponsor

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    Not trying to ruffle any feathers or anything...

    It seems that there are so many used Wicks being purchased for so cheap, even though they might be in perfect condition, vintage or not. Why is it that Wicks seem to depreciate in value so fast? Is it just that they don't have worldwide name recognition that say Fender has. Is it that because Fenders have been used by some of the worlds elite bass players for so long etc? Seems that, for instance, a 1988 Thumb in perfect shape...should be selling for far more than the original retail price of today's Thumbs....like $6000 - $8000 USD, type of thing.

    Just curious, if anyone else has thought about this. Does Warwick just need to be around for another 25 years before you'll see someone paying $10,000 for a 1988 Thumb in the year 2033? It would seem that because of the quality of Wicks (over Fenders), they would immediately begin to appreciate in value, but that does not seem to be the case.

    I just don't understand why a 1959 beat to hell Fender P-Bass can sell for like $20,000!

    What are you thoughts guys?

    Cheers,

    Scott
     
  2. Callum

    Callum

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    Thing is besides fenders there really aren't many basses that appreciate in value. Fender has a very long history and its that reason why the basses from 1959 and like 1962 sell for so much its more a collector thing imo, or that fanatic trying to get that exact tone from that time. Theres nothing wrong with this though each to him/herself.
     
  3. herb vibes

    herb vibes

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    fender is just history! everybody likes a precision or a jazzbass in the beginnig of the their bass career. fender just got the name. and they are good. while i think there are a lot of warwick haters too so they are not so "famous" as fender......
    i think there will be expensiv vintage warwick in future but only the thumb nt and stage1/2 will reach that status since they are part of the bass storys. other wicks are "side-projects" but still professionel instruments!
    so they value would be like for example a car that you can buy for half of its cost after one year or so.
    but i'm actually happy that i can buy my favourites basses for a low price:)
     
  4. EVOLVEBASS

    EVOLVEBASS

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    Personally, I think of Warwick basses as 'player' basses, and not as much as collector basses. That's not to say that vintage Warwicks won't skyrocket in value someday. Maybe I see it that way because I collect Wals and they are already worth 3 to 4 times as much as I paid for them, but my Warwicks are what I take on stage. Beyond vintage, I wouldn't even consider buying a new Thumb bass currently since a used one can be had for 1/3 the price...
     
  5. flipper_gv

    flipper_gv

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    most americans hate warwick mostly because it is not an american bass. The aftermarket depends on the american market to base its value. You know, a 2005 wick cannot be worth 2000 used in Italy if it is 1000 used in US, the guy will pay 1000$ for the used one in the states and pay maybe 400$ shipping and still save 600$. I think if it was only for the european aftermarket, used warwick would go for much more. Finally, a wick is a great bass but it's a heavyweight for most players. They buy the wick thinking that's one hell of a tone but after 1-2 months they can't stand the weight or neckdive anymore (some dudes are just too lazy to get used to it). So they sell it. Meaning the offer exceeds the demand. That results in a drop on the selling price.
     
  6. Grgzilla

    Grgzilla

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    Vintage Fenders are at their current prices due to one reason.People are buying them as superannuation investments.Vintage guitars in recent years have given better & safer returns than real estate & the stock market.
     
  7. Mr Rabble

    Mr Rabble

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    Used Warwick are much cheaper in Europe than in the USA.

    Don't be fooled by exchange rate: a used vintage Warwick in Italy sells for about 1200 euro.
    Regardless of the euro/dollar ratio the same bass goes around 1600$ in the USA.

    About the original question:
    "Why is it that Wicks seem to depreciate in value so fast?"

    Simply because no one wants to spend much money on a used Warwick, and sellers must adapt.

    When I was younger, around the early nineties, 70's Fenders, Rickenbacker and Musicmans were sold as old basses, and they went for few money.
    Now they are "vintage", no more simply "old", and this makes the difference.
    Mostly, Fenders from the seventies were considered crap.
    VIntrage market is led by collectors, not musicians.

    The best thing you can do actually is to buy an eighties Jazz or Precision, and your value will shortly raise.

    Maybe one thay the time for vintage Warwicks will come, who knows...
     
  8. vpshockwave

    vpshockwave

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    Ugh! Count me out. The sound of Fenders was so .. plain to me. A guitarist I play with has a Fender J and I had to play it for practice while I was waiting on my SSII to arrive. Talk about the most bland sound ever. I really don't see why everyone's first bass always seems to be a Fender. He seemed to be proud that it was made in Mexico too. Is that a good thing for Fenders? Here in the states being made in Mexico isn't like, something to go around bragging about. I mean, it's not bad, but it's not something you advertise to get people to buy your product.

    And one of the main reasons I HATE Fenders is their consistent and repetitive body style. It's an eyesore to me.

    Oh by the way, Warwicks are amazing.

    /endrant

    On a side note, I'm glad the prices are so low. It's a buyer's market! Would've never come across my SSII at a reasonable price if things weren't the way they are at the moment.

    It's almost like my country went into recession just for ME.
     
  9. Callum

    Callum

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    massive off topic......


    Price of fenders is American>Japanese>mexican irc.


    As for beginner basses fender has the coverage and that safe sound, conventional and loads of people use it.

    I've found that ibanez basses are also pretty popular beginner basses too.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Back on topic....

    I'll agree that warwicks are player basses, but tbh that can be said about any and i'm sure that the once vintage fenders were 'player basses'.

    Actually one theory i was thinking about was construction quality. Warwick has exceptional built quality and consistency with it. far greater than other bass brands including fender, Musicman, and Gibson. These have had runs of amazing instruments and duff ones. Warwick just has different runs. The vintage is slightly different, but still of the same high standard.

    Some basses have great years and runs, and this may put the value up in years to come over other basses. Warwick has the factory switch thats about it, still consistent build quality etc so ignoring condition would maybe bring all warwicks to be around the value dictated by demand.

    Tbh in the future i can only really see the truely vintage (one peice bridge, Non slanted tuners, older wood types ie cherry SSI's, EMG pups, Nobby's) to be the real collector items. Maybe pre- 90's thumbs, and 1990-1993 streamer (both kinds) to be really valuable just because of the history and the players.

    This is purely speculative i guess we'll just have to wait and see what happens!
     
  10. azzyrazzy

    azzyrazzy

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    If the normal new sales price was lower, it might not drop so much when selling used. It's like that for other high priced brands too.
     
  11. bassplayer22

    bassplayer22

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    Flip, I don't agree with this statement. Good bass players know good tone and I strongly believe that all bass players (real bass players), regardless of country, will buy the bass that they like the tone, feel, and looks of the most.

    Wicks are typically pretty expensive in the states and you have to look at martketability as well as quantity/stock. Typically, music stores don't like to stock expensive basses that won't sell. A majority of music stores stock the well knowns as well as the cheaper to low-end instruments. Fender happens to be a household name (naturally), so you will never have a hard time finding one in the states.

    Tim
     
  12. Indianerdaniel

    Indianerdaniel

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    Greg just hit the nail on the head :wink: Now besides this fact they do sound awesome... 8)
     
  13. Gerry

    Gerry

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    Ken Smith and Fodera hold thier value pretty well. Come to think of it, I've never seen either one casually hanging around in a music store like a $$ or Corvette. Not even the "low end" Ken Smith Burner model. Maybe if the Warwicks were more rare they would hold value. Also, the peolpe that sell these basses second hand, like on Ebay, don't sell thier basses cheap. Vintage seems to be a relative term. How long does a company have to exsist before the first models are considered vintage?
     
  14. elpelotero

    elpelotero

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    PRS has been around 20 some years and their 80's models sell for thousands...It's all relative. Who played what model when...
     
  15. golem

    golem Philosopher King

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    `

    WTF ??? It's NOT american, like Bartolini, Sadowski, Yamaha, etc etc ?

    She-he-it !!! Guess I'll be makin some space in my closet :-(


    +1 about Fender prices.

    It's all about nostalgia and obsession. It's not about the market value
    of instruments soley for how they might musically enable the player.

    Warwick does not lose more value than most other basses, even here
    in america where it is so despised :) Personal musical instruments do
    not retain a lot of resale value as a rule. There is an unwritten "Damnt
    if you do and damnt if you don't" law: Significant visible signs of regular
    use bring down the price of an instrument, as being well worn. A lack of
    signs of regular use indicate that an instrument was not well-loved, that
    for some reason, no one liked to play it, that it's a loser. DIYDADIYD.

    The only maker of non-Fender production-model basses and guitars that
    depreciate much slower than others is MusicMan, and this is for similar
    reasons as with Fender, but less extreme. At MM, Leo was there to build
    the company and the basses. The Ball family is historically intertwined in
    the story of Leo Fender and his companies. AFAIK, the current operators
    of GnL [Leo's 3rd and last company] do not have such a history and so
    their instruments do not hold resale value any better than a Peavey :-(

    It's all about Leo Fender. Nothing mysterious there. Leo is undeniably
    the Creator, the One, the Big Guy etc. The Holy Grail was not sought
    after merely for it's weight in gold. It was all about it's direct personal
    connection to diety. Same with old Fender basses, geetars and amps.

    `
     
  16. flipper_gv

    flipper_gv

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    Well, lemme explain the "it's not american so americans don't like it" statement. It isn't much about national pride or something like this but I'd say more like a cultural phenomenon. One of the easiest way to show this is with sport cars. There are far more vipers, cadillac or corvette in the states than there are ferraris, porshe or audi in Europe. You see, Americans tends to buy amercian brands of sport car because they have seen it a lot on tv shows (or other media) that were sponsored by the company to use that car. Same thing happens in Europe. It's like, ask in the 60s to some guy in the US what is a Ferrari and I bet most of them wouldn't have a clue about it.

    The same way, when warwick started not so long ago, people in the US didn't have a clue what it was and were *afraid* to buy one because people don't like what they don't know. So, most bassists continue buying what they knew that was able to do the job just right, fenders or gibson. You always need to remember that people are just too lazy to adapt and enjoy something that they don't know, it takes too much time. It's like trying to make a kid appreciate some weird but delicious vegetables when the only ones he ate and liked were potatoes and carrots.
     
  17. golem

    golem Philosopher King

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    +1 ... pretty much.

    Thaz why I threw in Yamaha as American, a back
    door joke stemming from the cultural phenomenon
    of "whatever is very familiar is native".

    BTW, I do find it amusing that Wicksters refer to a
    1990's Wick as "Vintage". I do realize that there is
    some tendency to prefer the all-wenge necks that
    went out at about Y2K .... sorry, but it's still funny.

    `
     
  18. maddrakkett

    maddrakkett R.I.P.

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    Well I've been buying used Warwicks cuz I can't afford new. But I always highly value my Warwicks, so I will hang onto them forever and maybe the collector value will enter in and they will be worth a lot. Still, I won't sell.

    My favorite bass and company isn't based on popularity or cost. I love the customer service and I love my basses and that's their true value IMO!
     
  19. Avram

    Avram Thread Killer

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    more people in the States drink Coors and Budweiser than microbrews or euro beers. "soda" beers tastes like chemical sh*t to me, but to the yahoos that just want to get high, they are wonderful and refreshing.

    most mass produced instrument players (fender, ibanez, yamaha, etc) just want a 'bass-ick' tone. they do NOT have, nor desire, discerning taste, they just want to 'get high' . those that play fodera, warwick, alembec, etc, are looking for a precise tone, and they pay for it, usually through the nose. They are looking for specific flavor.

    Fenders are all vanilla IMO. some are tasty vanilla, I guess, but they are all still vanilla or coors and budweiser. I like micro brews and ben and jerrys icecream so warwick is the brand for me. much flavor!

    as to why they dont hold their value: its the market baby! they are mostly expensive new, few people really understand their value, they are typically not 'collector' items, and they are not made by 3 guys in a small shop in upstate new york or something, so they arent considered 'custom' (though we all knnow that many are)

    Basicly what everyone else has said... :D
     
  20. Indianerdaniel

    Indianerdaniel

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    That's some statement mate :) I STRONGLY disagree. I'll leave it at that :)

    P.S I drink micro brews :wink:
     
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