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power of pentatonic

Discussion in 'Music Education - Share your knowledge here!' started by ridgebackdk, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. ridgebackdk

    ridgebackdk

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    just found this and think its a class way to show off the pentatonic scale thats is already built in to us all naturally..
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2016
  2. Florin

    Florin Warwick Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Very interesting, phil!
     
  3. ridgebackdk

    ridgebackdk

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    thanks florin,i thought so.sometimes its better to use your ears and play what you feel and not stick to rigid rules and scales.read somewhere stu zender never learned scales just played what he felt was right at the time.. :)
     
  4. -kC-

    -kC-

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    incredible!
     
  5. Bass Lady

    Bass Lady

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    Loved this video, Thanks for posting it Phil. I'm teaching pentatonic scales in school at the moment and am going to try this video out on this kids this week. 8:
     
  6. Adrian Ciuplea

    Adrian Ciuplea Warwick Endorser

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    hmm, is this video still available? I would love to see it
     
  7. Florin

    Florin Warwick Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Adrian, IIRC, it was Bobby Mcferin's workshop.
     
  8. Hector

    Hector Moderator Staff Member

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    I think this might be the new link?





    It's an extract from this 1.75 hour long video, which is quite interesting:

     
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  9. Bassist4Eris

    Bassist4Eris

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    Pentatonic scales are underrated. When I was younger I turned my nose up at them, because so many of my peers never learned any scales beyond pentatonic, and then proceeded to use the scales in predictable fashions. What I found out when I started learning some of my favorite riffs, was that most of them were largely if not entirely derived from the pentatonic.

    As the McFerrin video demonstrates, human ears seem to be drawn to this set of pitches, across various cultures. One of my favorite things to do is use it, but disguise it. Jazz musicians do this all the time in solos. For example, if the chord is Cmaj7, many rock and pop musicians will gravitate towards a C pentatonic major scale. But try a D pentatonic major instead sometime. It sound really hip, because it hits all the "jazz notes". D pentatonic major consists of D, E, F#, A, and B. Against a C major chord, this gives you the 9th, 3rd, #11, 13th, and 7th. But the beauty is, you don't have to memorize any of that. You just have to learn that very easy shape on the fretboard, and then try it a whole step higher than the chord next time you solo over a maj7. Bebop the easy way.

    Another convenient way to conceptualize the above trick is to simply think of it as the pentatonic minor scale a half-step below the root (or from the 7th if you prefer to think of it that way). So in the above example, I had you playing a D pentatonic major scale over a Cmaj7 chord. Now I'm saying you can use a B minor pentatonic over the same chord. Why? Because B minor pentatonic is relative to D major pentatonic (in other words, they contain all the same notes). I think this way all the time when called upon to solo over maj7 chords in a jazz context, because it lets me get away with a lot of my favorite blues licks, but makes them sound really different too. Just drop a half-step below the root and wail away!

    Another neat trick is to play over a 7th chord using the pentatonic major scale a tritone (three whole-steps, or six frets) away. So if the chord is G7, the vanilla choice is G pentatonic major, but you could try a C# pentatonic major instead. This gives you C# (the #11), Eb (the b13), F (the b7), Ab (the b9), and A# (the #9). Again, the theory isn't too important; just remember that you can try that very easy scale shape a tritone away from your root note when you're soloing (or composing) over a 7th chord, and all those jazz notes suddenly appear.
     
  10. Adrian Ciuplea

    Adrian Ciuplea Warwick Endorser

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    You are very wise.

    Great post
     
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  11. Bassist4Eris

    Bassist4Eris

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    Thank you Adrian. :)
     
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