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My Warwicks

Discussion in 'Bass Guitars' started by GenTech, Sep 2, 2008.

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  1. GenTech

    GenTech

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    Hi!

    I currently have a Vampyre SN5 and a Corvette Standard. I have been very satisfied with the both, especially the Vampyre. However, this was until I went into studio. I've always had a problem with the so called "clicking" sound. I've figured that it happens whenever I hit the string just a bit hard and it bounces into the lower frets on the bass. This makes a sound that's not very desirable.

    And this is even worse when you record. If it was for every touch it would be ok, but it just comes around once in a while (every tenth or so). So... Is there anyone that has a good idea what to do?

    I have already "elevated" the strings, and they're quite high, but it's still there. Not as frequent, but still there. I was wondering if filing down the lower frets would be a good idea? If not, what else could be done?

    However, I've been looking into maybe selling them both and getting a new one. And in this case, I'd like to get a bass in the same price range as the Vampyre. Though, even though I don't want to be unfaithful to Warwick, which has been my favorite brand for so long now, with the Vampyre and the Thumb especially. But I have been looking on the Rickenbacker 4003. I've heard a lot of good things about it. Does anyone have any experience with this?

    Anyways, if I wanted to get a new bass, what would be a good alternativ? I play in a melodic deathmetal band, so I need something with punch and a tone that gets through and doesn't just stay behind, if that makes any sense. It doesn't necessarily have to be a Warwick, but I wouldn't mind at all!

    Thanks for any answers
    Eskild :)
     
  2. Charmand G

    Charmand G

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    Shalom, Eskil.

    What I did, was that I put every knob on the amp-eq at a 12`o clock-position, except gain and volume of course. Then I relied mostly on the Vampyre`s pre-amp, switching the treble way down and putting the bass almost on full forward.

    This gave me much less treble-clicks, but still a bassy, punchy sound that does really well, at least on rehearsals.

    Remember: you cannot really tell how you will sound, until you have the other instruments there. Maybe the clicks will at a dimension to the sound.
     
  3. GenTech

    GenTech

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    Yeah, this seems logic. We did the same kind of thing, but not to the same extent. Would you say that filing the lower 2 or 3 frets down would be a bad idea. Cause the biggest problems are the H, E and A string.
     
  4. sjw1971

    sjw1971

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    When recording with my 2-band EQ Warwicks, I tend to roll off the treble a bit. The Q is very wide on the 2-band eq's and it is centered right in that 2.0K-2.5K hz area where fret clicking is very noticeable and nasty. Live, this is usually not an issue, but in the studio it's a pain. Also, the more you play over the bridge p/up, the less you'll click and clack.

    If you're recording, learn to rely on your engineer as well. They can pinpoint certain frequencies and then cut them with a very sharp Q, eliminating problem frequencies while leaving the nearby frequencies relatively intact. Since the area of 2.0K-3.0K hz is not one the bass thrives in, cutting these frequencies will not harm your recorded tone too much. To add a little sparkle back into your tone, you can have him bump up the 4.0K-4.5K hz and 8.5K hz frequencies a bit. As to the bass, I do not recommend boosting it beyond flat for recording as this will add too much bass, will muddy your tone and ultimately will cause you to be pulled down in the mix. Honestly, the thinner your tone (without going overbaoard), the better the final product because you'll sit better in the mix and then your mastering engineer will fatten things up with some good multi-band compression.

    I do raise string height slightly when recording in order to minimize fret buzz, but not that much - maybe 1/2 mm at the most.

    Listen to my Fortress MM clip on the Warwick compilation in the caffe for an example of these tone settings. I had the treble on my neck pickup at 0% and the bridge pickup at 40%, with the pan set mostly (about 70%) to the bridge. The bass on my neck pickup was at 20% and the bridge pickup was flat (50%). I trusted the mixing and mastering engineers to do the rest with my tone after explaining what I was after and I think they nailed it for me.
     
  5. GenTech

    GenTech

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    I see! Problem is, I don't have a tube amp, so I'm afraid of losing the punch..
     
  6. Eberbachl

    Eberbachl

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    I believe the problem is that you're not allowing your amp to do enough work, and are compensating by hitting the strings too hard. You can raise the action of course, but it will reach a point where you can not raise it any further.

    Try working on your technique, and playing with a softer attack, and relying on your amp more.

    A note played with a softer attack with an amp turned up louder actually has more overall volume (less difference between attack and sustain) than a note played with a hard attack (and big clicking noise) on an amp turned up less.

    I hope that makes sense.

    :D

    ...what I'm trying to say is work on your technique to stop the clicking sound of the strings hitting the frets, and use your amp to get the volume you need.

    ;)
     
  7. GenTech

    GenTech

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    Problem is, I've tried playing "weaker", but it's still there once in a while... Do you think taking down the frets would do any good?
     
  8. Gman

    Gman

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    Just checking but it's definitely the frets that are causing the noise and not your fingers?

    Sometimes when I play my second finger nail catches the string occasionally and this creates a slight clicky sound. I usually have to cut my nails right back to alleviate this.

    Just a thought - something else to eliminate before working on your bass :D

    G
     
  9. GenTech

    GenTech

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    I bite my nails to hell, so it couldn't be them :p
     
  10. Eberbachl

    Eberbachl

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    Personally, no - I don't think filing down any frets would help.

    I firmly believe it's a technique issue.

    ;)
     
  11. GenTech

    GenTech

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    Well, I don't know. I think I could alter my technique some, but I still don't have this problem on my Corvette, though!
     
  12. Charmand G

    Charmand G

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    Does the same thing happen if you use a plectrum? If not, then you might consider your technique.

    Many players tend to fingerpick the strings sort of inwards instead of upwards, causing them to hit the pickups, the woods, the neck etc.
    Maybe tilting your hand a bit forward/outward, away from the body, might help you. Still, I see how difficult it can be when you are in metal-band.
     
  13. GenTech

    GenTech

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    Yeah, I've been thinking the exact same thing, that I should tilt my hand a bit more down, so that I pick the strings more upwards than downwards, cause I believe I have a tendancy to do so (push them downwards towards the bass itself). Still, it's annoying when you've been playing like that for quite some time now! :?
     
  14. IncX

    IncX

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    the vampyre SN is a trebly bass (maple + wenge + ovangkol) ... if you dont want the clicking sound, at the same time you dont want to re-evaluate your technique.... get a new bass - like a buzzard... its the most "unclicky" bass ive ever touched. too bad since im a big fan of clicky, trebly basses.
     
  15. GenTech

    GenTech

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    Thanks for all the good answers! I guess I'd have to try and change my technique before I sell my love! :)
     
  16. TylerDurdenPSSC

    TylerDurdenPSSC

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    What about adjusting the truss rod?
     
  17. warwickhunt

    warwickhunt

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    One consideration!

    Is it the pick-up casing or pick-up? I had someone bring me a Warwick with a similar problem and they had already jacked the action to hell and back to no avail. I got it to remedy and established that by watching the guy play it happened when his fingers played over the pups (slightly tapping the pup casing). I believe it could have been that he pups were slightly microphonic. He adjusted his playing there and then and it disappeared. Rather than changing his whole technique we replaced the pups and no further problem :D

    I'm not saying this is the case for you but you could look at it :wink:
     
  18. Callum

    Callum

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    +1

    Everything sounds like its coming from your fingers, due to its inconsistency, and if you've raised the actions then this really should eliminate most fret noise and mean you can't pick up clicks from the strings touching the pickups.

    the dual J pickup is really sensitive, and so what you may think is insignificant it'll pickup. Finger nails my $$ had the problem as well and i had to stop hitting the pickups when playing about them, and adjust playing style due to my finger tips having generic bass player hands with hard skin etc.
     
  19. Charmand G

    Charmand G

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    It is true about the Vampyre SN, though. It is a bass- and treble-monster.

    I have to correct myself from my first post:
    I found that boosting the mids a little bit on the amp, say 1/2 o`clock-position, gave it a more even sound/EQ.

    Still, somehow I feel that the "click" sort of confirms my presence in the band-sound.

    Gen, what amp do you record through?
     
  20. EVOLVEBASS

    EVOLVEBASS

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    Are you recording your bass tracks using a DI? If so, this is a common problem/side effect. DI's can add a ton of fret noise in the studio.

    Try recording your cabinet mic'd or a combination of mic'd cab and DI. I'd be very surprised if this didn't dramatically improve or flat-out solve your problem. Good luck!
     
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