hardware finish and paint complain

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:D .. i allready asked Gregory in 2008 why the paint on my 500 euro piezo bridge is full of dust or something rough in it? he said that i'm the first person to ask this question :D

ok, i'm a perfectionist! don't kill me, that's why i play Warwick basses :D

this was the first time i saw the dust under the paint (don't know exactly what is under the finish) and i started to look to my other Wicks. they are all the same, no mather what color. they are working great, no problem with that, but in my opinion after the talk with Gregory, is that maybe they want to make the best basses, and the best hardware, etc. but they don't see what's happening and without reviews or some input they can't improve this little thing, even if they would like to offer the best possible.

so here is my observation ... :D there is something NOT smooth as it should be under the paint. this is a little thing to change to get the best possible.

this morning i polished a little the volume knob on my new SS2 with the same thing as i polished the knobs on my vintage streamer. the knob become from gold to chrome :D , that's not a big problem too .. just add something to that color to hold the gold tone in it for a longer time. this is not an isolated case. my vintage streamer's hardware after 30 years is still GOLD, no mather what i do. another thing, my SS2 had a single set of strings .. the originals from the factory, i replaced them and i saw that the finish on the tuning machines are fully scratched allready, and chromish .. i looked to the vintage streamer, after 30 years of wear they look like new :lol:

now ... all of this is nothing compared to the CS expensive gold piezo bridge with the same problems on my ex Thumb.

so .. there's just a step to make for a perfect job, as you can improve the nuts, maybe you can improve a little the finish too .. :lol:

in the attachements there's no reflection in the gold hardware .. it is just the rough paint, and something under the finish and it should be as a mirror. compared to the old Schaller bridge this is a cheap and ugly finish.
 

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I think you are the first one that makes this issue a thread topic. It has been mentioned before but not as the main topic of a thread.

I agree. The newer basses come with a golden hardware that fades very fast. And if you touch it with a cleaner such as Brasso becomes Chrome colored instead. Also I have thought about using clear colored spray onto them to make them hold their golden color as the vintage hardware did but have not tried it yet.

anybody knows why they fade so fast?
 
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I know chrome plating for car parts is very expensive due to the toxic chemicals involved.There is also a lot of work invloved to make the finished product glass smooth.I think the rough finish is caused by the parts not being cast perfect.
 
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james brunnning said:
I know chrome plating for car parts is very expensive due to the toxic chemicals involved.There is also a lot of work invloved to make the finished product glass smooth.I think the rough finish is caused by the parts not being cast perfect.

i agree with you, it might be a difficult process, but look at the entire bridge, 80% is glass smooth :D .. why the hell can't be done 100%? .. my ideea was that they don't see the problem when they make the saddles etc., it's not a hiden ugly finish because nobody observes, in my opinion, it's only an error that must be fixed.
 
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I agree with you that the finish one the hardware is quite fragile....
 
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One thing about the vintage hardware is that it's very heavy.It's solid machined brass.Alot of players dont like this as it makes playing for long periods uncomfortable.Also,since those days newer,lighter & tonally better materials have come into being.Now alot of players prefer the heavy old hardware & you can buy it from after market suppliers & even Warwick themselves.& alot of players prefer the new lighter hardware.Then there's the question of ecomonics.Building & selling basses 20 years ago was a different bussiness than today.Companies these days have to be alot more competetive in their pricing for the company to remain viable.
I've come across alot of people who's expectations are unresonably high.The want every tiny detail to be to their exacting standards or they label something complete crap.Dont take what I'm saying personally guys. :wink: But if want every detail to meet your highest possible standards then you shouldnt be looking at a production model instrument & shell out $10,000+ on something like an Alembic or Ritter custom,for example.
No offense to the thread starter,but cmon.It's a bass guitar.It's meant to make music with.It's not an antique family eirloom that's priceless.These bass are a few grands worth.
:)
 
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Greg said:
One thing about the vintage hardware is that it's very heavy.It's solid machined brass.Alot of players dont like this as it makes playing for long periods uncomfortable.Also,since those days newer,lighter & tonally better materials have come into being.Now alot of players prefer the heavy old hardware & you can buy it from after market suppliers & even Warwick themselves.& alot of players prefer the new lighter hardware.Then there's the question of ecomonics.Building & selling basses 20 years ago was a different bussiness than today.Companies these days have to be alot more competetive in their pricing for the company to remain viable.
I've come across alot of people who's expectations are unresonably high.The want every tiny detail to be to their exacting standards or they label something complete crap.Dont take what I'm saying personally guys. :wink: But if want every detail to meet your highest possible standards then you shouldnt be looking at a production model instrument & shell out $10,000+ on something like an Alembic or Ritter custom,for example.
No offense to the thread starter,but cmon.It's a bass guitar.It's meant to make music with.It's not an antique family eirloom that's priceless.These bass are a few grands worth.
:)

I don't know in wich way to explain what i want to say .. i can't understand why people react like this. I expect to see something else: "We did not knew that these metal pieces were finished like this" for example .. because the rest of the pieces are glass smooth as i mentioned. i wanted to say something like the JAN2 thing: it's too sharp at the edges, and too sensitive :D

some people react exactly like this: go and buy a Fodera! :D but why if we don't know yet if they saw this kind of paint, or did they care or not about it? if they care they will make it well, if not it's their business. and by the way i saw and owned cheaper basses than W and this was the ugliest finish i ever saw. i don't need to buy an expensive bass to get a good finish on the bridge .. this is true :D

i don't think this kind of little adjustments are a BIG investment for a 20 years old bassmaker ... and if Warwick was mine i would say thank you for any kind of little helps that cost a little effort for quality.
 
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I'm just not getting why you're having such a panic attack about a couple of less than perfectly finished parts on the bridge. I would never even have noticed that.
 
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anghel said:
Greg said:
One thing about the vintage hardware is that it's very heavy.It's solid machined brass.Alot of players dont like this as it makes playing for long periods uncomfortable.Also,since those days newer,lighter & tonally better materials have come into being.Now alot of players prefer the heavy old hardware & you can buy it from after market suppliers & even Warwick themselves.& alot of players prefer the new lighter hardware.Then there's the question of ecomonics.Building & selling basses 20 years ago was a different bussiness than today.Companies these days have to be alot more competetive in their pricing for the company to remain viable.
I've come across alot of people who's expectations are unresonably high.The want every tiny detail to be to their exacting standards or they label something complete crap.Dont take what I'm saying personally guys. :wink: But if want every detail to meet your highest possible standards then you shouldnt be looking at a production model instrument & shell out $10,000+ on something like an Alembic or Ritter custom,for example.
No offense to the thread starter,but cmon.It's a bass guitar.It's meant to make music with.It's not an antique family eirloom that's priceless.These bass are a few grands worth.
:)

I don't know in wich way to explain what i want to say .. i can't understand why people react like this. I expect to see something else: "We did not knew that these metal pieces were finished like this" for example .. because the rest of the pieces are glass smooth as i mentioned. i wanted to say something like the JAN2 thing: it's too sharp at the edges, and too sensitive :D

some people react exactly like this: go and buy a Fodera! :D but why if we don't know yet if they saw this kind of paint, or did they care or not about it? if they care they will make it well, if not it's their business. and by the way i saw and owned cheaper basses than W and this was the ugliest finish i ever saw. i don't need to buy an expensive bass to get a good finish on the bridge .. this is true :D

i don't think this kind of little adjustments are a BIG investment for a 20 years old bassmaker ... and if Warwick was mine i would say thank you for any kind of little helps that cost a little effort for quality.


There's reasonable lengths one expects to satisfy customers,but like I said before,there is always going to be those that are never satisfied.
Please,try to understand what I'm saying here.I'm not saying you're one of those people.I'm saying that you cant expect every fine detail to be to your personal satisfaction.This is an extremely minor detail in the bridge.Some would say you're too fussy.
I know Warwick builds some of the best basses.SOME of the best.Not THE best,because there is no such thing.
This is a machine,a musical instrument.It's not a piece of fine jewlery.
I'm sorry I cant say to you that you're completely right & this will be rectified right away.I cant say what you want to hear.But that's life.Nothing's perfect.
 
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I agree with both Greg and Anghel. You're dishing out 2,000+ for an instrument, I would expect some quality control, but its also an instrument, its meant to be used and slightly abused in some context. For me, as long as it plays perfectly, I don't care.
 
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Greg said:
anghel said:
Greg said:
One thing about the vintage hardware is that it's very heavy.It's solid machined brass.Alot of players dont like this as it makes playing for long periods uncomfortable.Also,since those days newer,lighter & tonally better materials have come into being.Now alot of players prefer the heavy old hardware & you can buy it from after market suppliers & even Warwick themselves.& alot of players prefer the new lighter hardware.Then there's the question of ecomonics.Building & selling basses 20 years ago was a different bussiness than today.Companies these days have to be alot more competetive in their pricing for the company to remain viable.
I've come across alot of people who's expectations are unresonably high.The want every tiny detail to be to their exacting standards or they label something complete crap.Dont take what I'm saying personally guys. :wink: But if want every detail to meet your highest possible standards then you shouldnt be looking at a production model instrument & shell out $10,000+ on something like an Alembic or Ritter custom,for example.
No offense to the thread starter,but cmon.It's a bass guitar.It's meant to make music with.It's not an antique family eirloom that's priceless.These bass are a few grands worth.
:)

I don't know in wich way to explain what i want to say .. i can't understand why people react like this. I expect to see something else: "We did not knew that these metal pieces were finished like this" for example .. because the rest of the pieces are glass smooth as i mentioned. i wanted to say something like the JAN2 thing: it's too sharp at the edges, and too sensitive :D

some people react exactly like this: go and buy a Fodera! :D but why if we don't know yet if they saw this kind of paint, or did they care or not about it? if they care they will make it well, if not it's their business. and by the way i saw and owned cheaper basses than W and this was the ugliest finish i ever saw. i don't need to buy an expensive bass to get a good finish on the bridge .. this is true :D

i don't think this kind of little adjustments are a BIG investment for a 20 years old bassmaker ... and if Warwick was mine i would say thank you for any kind of little helps that cost a little effort for quality.


There's reasonable lengths one expects to satisfy customers,but like I said before,there is always going to be those that are never satisfied.
Please,try to understand what I'm saying here.I'm not saying you're one of those people.I'm saying that you cant expect every fine detail to be to your personal satisfaction.This is an extremely minor detail in the bridge.Some would say you're too fussy.
I know Warwick builds some of the best basses.SOME of the best.Not THE best,because there is no such thing.
This is a machine,a musical instrument.It's not a piece of fine jewlery.
I'm sorry I cant say to you that you're completely right & this will be rectified right away.I cant say what you want to hear.But that's life.Nothing's perfect.

hehe, i don't want better basses, i like them, especially the basses before improvements were made. my favourite bass is the vintage one, and it is not a perfect bass, it is hand made, but everything on it smells like "the best possible" :D now we are passing trough "improvements" era, and such minor things can't be done .. my ex thumb and my SS2 are better in construction and detail than the hand made ones .. the JAN3 is better then the JAN2, everything was harder to realize and improve then a better type of gold spray on the knob :lol: but, anyway .. it's not my business, i just know that i'm right :lol: this is not changing things, this is just the last improvement to a beautifull and smart piece of unique bridge!

i'll not forget to mention that you are right, this is a minor thing :wink:
 
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I never even noticed this until today. ok the fading gold hardware i knew about but i like that, platinum gold colour it fades to.

I had a check of my basses and well i can't see it in the black hardware, + it looks like its, as james brunnning mentioned, slight imprefections in the casing of the parts. IMO this would be a waste of money to make sure each was perfect, quality control as a mix of compromises, it assures is of a certain quality level and not a 'perfect level', perfection comes at an extremely high price that makes it unfeasable.

Instead of looking at the negatives think if that is the only issue you have with the bass, well warwick must be doing an 'effing good job to get 0.1% away from a 'perfect' bass!

ps also i didn't know you could get old brass hardware, this is a cool fact!
 
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I meant JAN 1 Callum.
They dont sell brass tuners,bridges etc.
 
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im curious... do basses like Fodera or Alembic have these "imperfections?"

im really not much of a nit picker, the warwicks i have now have some buzz heavy areas, but im not complaning since its really not too bad to warrant a complaint.
 
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I sure warwick could make the bidge perfect but then it would be reflected in the price.I think part of the switch to other metal's then brass is price and casting parts is cheaper then machining them.The weight might be a factor but wouldn't a heavy bridge help balance the thumb bass.Not trying to switch the topic :)
 
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I actually have a few minor
scratches on my bridge, so
this is something I've never
actually noticed... The one thing
however, that I have, are
those ugly casting "shadows"
left in the shape of large circles
on the front and back of the
bridge.

However, when I play, I'm
not looking at the bridge, so
it's all good then. When she's
set down, I'm steady starin' at
the grain, so again, no problemo.
 
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IncX said:
im curious... do basses like Fodera or Alembic have these "imperfections?"

im really not much of a nit picker, the warwicks i have now have some buzz heavy areas, but im not complaning since its really not too bad to warrant a complaint.

yes they have, every basses I've seen or heard about had a sensible spot. I don't care about the finish on the hardware as I rarely care about the finish on my basses.
 
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A question that just crossed my mind is; since you bought a stage 1 and stage 2, why dont you try and buy ur thumb back?
 
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james brunnning said:
I sure warwick could make the bidge perfect but then it would be reflected in the price.I think part of the switch to other metal's then brass is price and casting parts is cheaper then machining them.The weight might be a factor but wouldn't a heavy bridge help balance the thumb bass.Not trying to switch the topic :)

That's right James.
In fact,Ned Steinberger(as well as Warwick) used a solid brass weight under the bridge to counter act the weight of the tuners on the headstock.
These days,there's a light weight frame under it coz the tuners are alot lighter & the weight is no longer needed.
One of the reasons NS designed the headless bass was to reduce weight at the end of the neck,making it easier to handle.
 

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Perhaps though it's just a matter of dust control that can be easily corrected.
 
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