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Fixing my warwick neck.

Discussion in 'Bass Guitars' started by Lillinator, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. Lillinator

    Lillinator

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    Has anybody ever sanded down an ovangkol neck before? I love my warwick but the neck is just too thick for me. I dont wanna sell but I might have too.
     
  2. Florin

    Florin Warwick Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Some guys did it with success... But I would be afraid to do this.
     
  3. Eberbachl

    Eberbachl

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    I have heard of people doing this successfuly, but I wouldn't do it myself. I certainly would take it to a competent luthier if you're considering it. There are (steel or carbon?) reinforcing bars in the neck either side of the truss rod... you certainly don't want to sand so much off that you hit them, and how do you know how deep they are?
     
  4. Mr Praline

    Mr Praline Forum Silly Person

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    Yeah, and the neck was built by design of neck thickness. It could very well ♣♣♣♣ up the neck permanently.
     
  5. james brunnning

    james brunnning

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    there is a cut away view of the neck on the warwick site some where.and you can see how close to the outside of the neck the steel bars are.i wouldn't sand it down if y ou cut into where the bars are then you open a new can of worms.some of the older warwicks had a thinner neck.look for one of those and sell the bass you have.or you could try and give it time and see if you get used to it.but i know what your saying about neck profile.
     
  6. Augie

    Augie The Desert Bass-ape

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    the newer wicks also have a thinner neck, maybe try and get a trade in. i would always be a bit nervous about buggering up the balance, feel but most importantly the strength of the neck. that wood is there for a reason.
     
  7. Lillinator

    Lillinator

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    Very true. I should probably suck it up and be a man with my wick :) haha thanks guys!
     
  8. stinky634

    stinky634

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    You may get used to it, you may realize that you just cant stand it. For me, it was instant love. It felt great to have some mass to the bass. It felt better, felt more expensive and sturdy, and I am sure it adds to the tone as well.

    On the other hand there are players out there that hate thick necks and needs slim necks to be comfortable. At least with Warwick you have the option to order one with the neck you want, or just find one used.
     
  9. broken thumb

    broken thumb

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    If you have a good knowledge of wood working skills, this is indeed a a very easy modification. I have done it with great results on my 02 thumb nt4. In the case of this particular bass the neck carve was a bastard of such, the thickness and profile were good towards the nut end of the neck (round C shape,reminiscent of my older wenge necked thumb) as i would move my hand towards the body the neck felt swollen and chunky (thicker D shape, particularly around the 12th fret) from there further towards the body the neck actually became thinner with an even flatter D profile. It was this bulge in the middle of the neck that caused me to FIX the neck. First I removed the strings, and adjusted the truss rod so that the neck was perfectly straight.(A framing square used as a straight edge to confirm) Next with the bass face down on a stable work surface (Be sure to put down a soft cloth first, a plush bath towel does the trick) I took the shorter side of my square, again used a s a straight edge to determine where to start sanding. In my case it was between the 17th and 3rd frets with the majority of the work at the 12 fret( the fulcrum of the straight edge). Starting with 200 grit paper in my hang grasped in a firm C shape I sanded from the middle and worked either way (paying close attention to knocking down the hard D shape.) Checking my progress with the straight edge every couple minutes. When I was content the the bulge was removed (straight from the volute to the neck heel) I worked on contouring the neck into the desired C shape, Sliding my hand up and down the neck until I was content with the shape. From there all that is left is fine sanding with 300 grit, again with 400 grit, again with 600g, and finishing with 1000g. I then used compressed air to remove all dust from the neck grain, and the rest of the bass. Lastly was restoring the wax finish, first using my finger to force as much wax into the wood as possible, buffing and repeating. I restrung, adjusted the T rod, and low and behold Custom neck better suited to my taste. Keep in mind that this was my experience and I removed very little actual neck material to achieve the results i was looking for. If you are the least bit weary about performing this type of mod, Please take it to a professional.
     
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