Cool Films You've Seen Lately

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so do you have a wheel of pain there? :)
Forgot all about that- talk about an endorphin rush- the last time I missed three days of work-

I’ve had family there since the early-70’s and my last visit was in October -
 
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Just watched Frida, the Frida Kahlo biopic. Excellent, engrossing film about one of art's true originals. Recommended.
 
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Just watched Frida, the Frida Kahlo biopic. Excellent, engrossing film about one of art's true originals. Recommended.

It's totally appropriate that Big Business recognise this Visionary with a Barbie
 
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I am planning on watching

" I am not your Negro" which is like a documentary built from unpublished James Baldwin writings. He was totally amazing.
 
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BBC’s 1979 production of Huxley’s Brave New World- Two priceless scenes for me start at 13 and 20 minutes-

 
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I hated the original, but all the same on Friday night I watched the remake of Jumanji based on a co-worker's recommendation, and also because my GF wanted to see it. The premise has been updated from board game to video game, making the reboot something like a cross between the original and Tron. It's every bit as stupid as it sounds, but manages to actually be very funny thanks to the comedy skills of the four leads: Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart, and Jack Black. While all of them deliver the goods, Black is the standout here. He hilariously portrays a self-absorbed teenage girl who finds herself magically sucked into a video game, where she is now a middle-aged male zoologist. In a way it's the perfect role for him; his persona in Tenacious D has much the same narcissism. Anyway, if you enjoy Black's comedy style, you need to see this movie, no matter how dumb it actually is.

Last night I watched In the Heat of the Night, the 1967 classic starring Sidney Poitier as an African American Philadelphia police officer who helps a racist redneck cop solve a murder in a fictional southern town. The sociopolitical significance of such a film at that time should be obvious to anyone familiar with American history, but what really struck me was the creative cinematography. Well, that and the sheer magnitude of Poitier. I can think of no other word to describe such a commanding presence.
 
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I hated the original, but all the same on Friday night I watched the remake of Jumanji based on a co-worker's recommendation, and also because my GF wanted to see it. The premise has been updated from board game to video game, making the reboot something like a cross between the original and Tron. It's every bit as stupid as it sounds, but manages to actually be very funny thanks to the comedy skills of the four leads: Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart, and Jack Black. While all of them deliver the goods, Black is the standout here. He hilariously portrays a self-absorbed teenage girl who finds herself magically sucked into a video game, where she is now a middle-aged male zoologist. In a way it's the perfect role for him; his persona in Tenacious D has much the same narcissism. Anyway, if you enjoy Black's comedy style, you need to see this movie, no matter how dumb it actually is.

Last night I watched In the Heat of the Night, the 1967 classic starring Sidney Poitier as an African American Philadelphia police officer who helps a racist redneck cop solve a murder in a fictional southern town. The sociopolitical significance of such a film at that time should be obvious to anyone familiar with American history, but what really struck me was the creative cinematography. Well, that and the sheer magnitude of Poitier. I can think of no other word to describe such a commanding presence.

Regarding In the Heat of the Night and other films of that time frame, there was a an aesthetic of overall production values (directing, acting, dialogue, lighting, sound) that many films lack today.

I've recently watched two films of that ilk, though they came much later-- Alien and La Femme Nikita.
 
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I hated the original, but all the same on Friday night I watched the remake of Jumanji based on a co-worker's recommendation, and also because my GF wanted to see it. The premise has been updated from board game to video game, making the reboot something like a cross between the original and Tron. It's every bit as stupid as it sounds, but manages to actually be very funny thanks to the comedy skills of the four leads: Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart, and Jack Black. While all of them deliver the goods, Black is the standout here. He hilariously portrays a self-absorbed teenage girl who finds herself magically sucked into a video game, where she is now a middle-aged male zoologist. In a way it's the perfect role for him; his persona in Tenacious D has much the same narcissism. Anyway, if you enjoy Black's comedy style, you need to see this movie, no matter how dumb it actually is.

Last night I watched In the Heat of the Night, the 1967 classic starring Sidney Poitier as an African American Philadelphia police officer who helps a racist redneck cop solve a murder in a fictional southern town. The sociopolitical significance of such a film at that time should be obvious to anyone familiar with American history, but what really struck me was the creative cinematography. Well, that and the sheer magnitude of Poitier. I can think of no other word to describe such a commanding presence.

Given that you liked the latter, you might consider watching The Pawnbroker, another 60's film noire featuring Rod Steiger as the titular character.
 

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Last night I watched In the Heat of the Night, the 1967 classic starring Sidney Poitier as an African American Philadelphia police officer who helps a racist redneck cop solve a murder in a fictional southern town. The sociopolitical significance of such a film at that time should be obvious to anyone familiar with American history, but what really struck me was the creative cinematography. Well, that and the sheer magnitude of Poitier. I can think of no other word to describe such a commanding presence.

Another good film of his is To Sir, With Love. Not as powerful as In The Heat Of The Night, but still a decent film.
 
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Another good film of his is To Sir, With Love. Not as powerful as In The Heat Of The Night, but still a decent film.

I saw that back in the 90s and barely remember it. I should re-watch it sometime.
 
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I hated the original, but all the same on Friday night I watched the remake of Jumanji based on a co-worker's recommendation, and also because my GF wanted to see it. The premise has been updated from board game to video game, making the reboot something like a cross between the original and Tron. It's every bit as stupid as it sounds, but manages to actually be very funny thanks to the comedy skills of the four leads: Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart, and Jack Black. While all of them deliver the goods, Black is the standout here. He hilariously portrays a self-absorbed teenage girl who finds herself magically sucked into a video game, where she is now a middle-aged male zoologist. In a way it's the perfect role for him; his persona in Tenacious D has much the same narcissism. Anyway, if you enjoy Black's comedy style, you need to see this movie, no matter how dumb it actually is.

Last night I watched In the Heat of the Night, the 1967 classic starring Sidney Poitier as an African American Philadelphia police officer who helps a racist redneck cop solve a murder in a fictional southern town. The sociopolitical significance of such a film at that time should be obvious to anyone familiar with American history, but what really struck me was the creative cinematography. Well, that and the sheer magnitude of Poitier. I can think of no other word to describe such a commanding presence.

I guess that's one of the appeals of film in that it can bullshit from woe to go but still have a line or concept of wtf

Cop Siesta for an example of this.
 

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Saw Blade Runne 2049... Don't understand what all the hate was about. It was a good film, you would have to have seen the original to understand it...
 
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First saw this in the theater in 1988 and thought it was due for a rewatch-

 
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First saw this on TV in the 80’s though it had been made in 1973- with Britt Eklund (who couldn’t love her!) she was not the poor man’s but a likeable Faye Dunaway-

This particular clip doesn’t have Britt Eklund but it’s Miss Thomsett is cool-

Here’s a heavier but touching clip near the end of the film-
 
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The Darwin Awards with Joseph Fiennes and Winona Ryder-- had some funny moments-

 
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